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To date, there is no evidence of recreational use of CBD or any public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.

A World Health Organization (WHO) report has found no adverse health outcomes but rather several medical applications for cannabidiol, a.k.a. CBD, despite U.S. federal policy on this cannabinoid chemical.

According to a preliminary WHO report published last month, naturally occurring CBD is safe and well tolerated in humans (and animals), and is not associated with any negative public health effects.

Experts further stated that CBD, a non-psychoactive chemical found in cannabis, does not induce physical dependence and is “not associated with abuse potential.” The WHO also wrote that, unlike THC, people aren’t getting high off of CBD, either.

“To date, there is no evidence of recreational use of CBD or any public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD,”

The WHO team determined that CBD has “been demonstrated as an effective treatment for epilepsy” in adults, children, and even animals, and that there’s “preliminary evidence” that CBD could be useful in treating  Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, psychosis, Parkinson’s disease, and other serious conditions.

In acknowledgement of these kinds of discoveries in recent years, the report continued, “Several countries have modified their national controls to accommodate CBD as a medicinal product.”

But the U.S., the report noted, isn’t one of them. As a cannabis component, CBD remains classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning it has a “high potential for abuse” in the federal government’s view. Nevertheless, the “unsanctioned medical use” of CBD is fairly common, experts found.

In the UK, the Home Office designated CBD as non-pychoactive and therefore recommended it not be scheduled as a controlled substance.

CBD derived from EU registered hemp strains is legal to buy, sell and consume in the UK.  At CIITECH, we welcome this decision and hope many other countries begin to catch up to the UK position that CBD and related cannabinoids derived from hemp should be regulated as food supplements.

 

Some content sourced from FORBES